Companies across the US are extending pay terms, leaving suppliers to pay the price.

Days payables outstanding at the nation’s 1,000 largest companies averages nearly 57. More than 40% of all shippers require pay terms greater than 30 days. Some of the nation’s largest companies even stretch days to pay to 120.

Extended pay terms financially strain suppliers, especially smaller businesses susceptible to cash flow struggles. This is particularly true for transportation providers, 97% of which fall into the small business category with fewer than 20 trucks.

Factoring addresses conflicting capital interests between companies and their suppliers by providing accelerated receivables at a fee. If leveraged correctly, factoring improves liquidity and profitability for suppliers. However, lack of understanding sometimes leads people to give factoring a bad rap as a poor business practice rather than a helpful financial tool. Those individuals might be the ones leaving the most money on the table.

Bad Rap #1: “Anyone who factors isn’t running their business properly.”

Transportation requires many large upfront investments for equipment and insurance, in addition to several thousand dollars spent weekly for fuel and pay. Businesses must have good cash flow to survive, which factoring provides. Receivable delays have a ripple effect contributing to financial impacts like late payment fees, loan defaults or credit line interest that could cost a transportation provider more than a factoring fee. Extended pay terms also stymie business growth in an industry currently short 50,000 drivers. Every business is different; therefore, factoring does not indicate poor cash management. Rather it shows companies working to thrive in this very capital-intensive industry.

Bad Rap #2: “I do all the work for you to get paid.”

The right factoring partner should decrease a client’s workload. Good factoring companies, like FreightRover’s partner Rover180, assume responsibilities for much of the back-office work around payments. First, factoring companies check shipper credit before a carrier picks up a load to ensure they are hauling for solvent businesses. Clients then submit invoice images by mobile phone or email. The factor issues payment to the client and collects on the invoice as it becomes due from the payor. The transportation provider can spend their time and resources moving more freight rather than calling multiple shippers collecting on invoices.

Bad Rap #3: “I’ve got bad credit. Factoring won’t help me.”

Factoring cares about the credit worthiness of the shipper/payor, not the payee. Many transportation providers that struggled with credit in the past prefer factoring. It often results in a lower rate than high interest short-term loans and provides quick payments to businesses unable to obtain credit otherwise.

Bad Rap #4: “You never know what you’ll actually be paid when you factor.”

Not all factoring companies are created equal. Understanding the factoring contract is key to managing receivables and knowing deposit amounts in advance. Some factoring companies offer a low invoice factoring rate, and then make additional money from monthly minimum requirements, invoice processing fees, and payment issuances. Other factoring companies might offer a slightly higher factoring rate and eliminate all other fees. Non-recourse agreements command higher rates than recourse. Factoring companies also consider how quickly they receive payment on invoices. Shippers with extended terms beyond 30 days could prompt higher factoring rates on invoices to account for the cash float. Businesses that know their contract and shippers, know their receivable amounts due.

Bad Rap #5: “Factoring costs too much.”

Companies have many financing options for their business, and factoring represents one of them. Transportation providers should compare factoring fees to other options like loans or credit to see what rate works best for their business. Factoring often proves to be the lowest fee option. Many suppliers that factor include the rate in their linehaul agreements with shippers to get paid quickly without compromising overall income. Businesses also benefit from other savings factoring companies may provide around equipment, fuel and insurance.

Factoring also creates some parity among shippers. Freight decisions transition from when a transportation provider will get paid to better metrics like lane quality, utilization and load rate to maximize profitability.

Bad Rap #6: “Factoring takes too long to get paid.”

Factoring issues quick payments by design. If a transportation provider does not receive payment within 24 hours, which is industry standard, a broken process with the factoring company likely exists and it is time to ask questions.

Bad Rap #7: “Once you start factoring, you can never stop.”

Factoring companies work hard to keep your business, but you can cancel based on contract terms. Contracts for reputable factors include defined durations and reasonable termination notice periods. To switch factoring partners, the process typically requires a written notice of termination and an authorization agreement to transfer receivables. The new factoring company will issue notice of assignments on the transportation provider’s behalf to each payor to update them on where to send funds. Switching factoring companies does require coordination between all parties, but the cost savings can be worth the work.

Businesses letting the myths outweigh the math might be missing out on money. To learn more about how the best factoring companies set themselves apart, watch our quick video on FreightRover Factoring, test our savings calculator, or request the right questions to ask factoring companies.

FreightRover just launched a $500 million financing facility for advancing supply chain and factoring operations nationwide. But what does that actually mean? And why is it important?

Through our affiliate partner Rover180, we have taken a new approach to factoring and supply chain finance. Traditional programs are subject to extensive bank regulation compliance, which limits options and adoption. Rover180’s program provides an alternative by not impacting a buyer’s balance sheet or requiring Unified Commercial Code-1 (UCC-1) filings.

Rover180’s accelerated receivables model is unique in design and application. The supply chain finance program focuses on improving a buyer’s working capital. It consolidates all supplier payments into one monthly payee and annual 1099, extends the days to pay until after goods are sold, and has the benefit of no financing fees. It also supports supplier liquidity by offering flexible receivable terms, payment in as little as 24 hours, and ACH direct deposits.

Rover180’s factoring is just as simple and efficient. With low rates and no extra charge for same-day pay, factoring is stress-free. There are no reserves or holdbacks and the entire process is mobile friendly. Through FreightRover and Rover180’s partnership, factoring carriers also gain access to discounts on fuel and over-the-road medical care. There is instant carrier, payor and invoice approval, and like supply chain finance, vendors can receive same-day pay via ACH deposit. (Questions about factoring?)

This is a big deal for businesses across America. Among top US companies, average days to pay suppliers sits at 57, a number growing annually. This trend negatively impacts smaller suppliers who often struggle with cash flow, especially in the capital-intensive transportation industry. FreightRover and Rover180’s program helps companies extend pay terms to improve working capital while still supporting the liquidity needs of their valuable supplier base.

FreightRover’s technology for invoicing and straight-through payment processing powers this new facility that creates about $50 billion a year of funding capacity.

FreightRover’s partnership with Rover180 signifies a new, faster, more efficient way to manage your pay. Everyone benefits, from buyers and shippers to carriers and other suppliers, and there’s something for everyone, whether you’re working with factoring or supply chain financing. The future is looking bright, and FreightRover and Rover180 are leading the way.

Factoring improves cash flow for businesses, especially small fleets. It pays invoices quicker for a fee to help fleets spend more time on operations and less on back office work.

A good factoring company should be a partner. Trucking companies work hard to earn money. They shouldn’t have to work extra to collect on it too. Ask these key questions to find the best factoring partner for your business…