Companies across the US are extending pay terms, leaving suppliers to pay the price.

Days payables outstanding at the nation’s 1,000 largest companies averages nearly 57. More than 40% of all shippers require pay terms greater than 30 days. Some of the nation’s largest companies even stretch days to pay to 120.

Extended pay terms financially strain suppliers, especially smaller businesses susceptible to cash flow struggles. This is particularly true for transportation providers, 97% of which fall into the small business category with fewer than 20 trucks.

Factoring addresses conflicting capital interests between companies and their suppliers by providing accelerated receivables at a fee. If leveraged correctly, factoring improves liquidity and profitability for suppliers. However, lack of understanding sometimes leads people to give factoring a bad rap as a poor business practice rather than a helpful financial tool. Those individuals might be the ones leaving the most money on the table.

Bad Rap #1: “Anyone who factors isn’t running their business properly.”

Transportation requires many large upfront investments for equipment and insurance, in addition to several thousand dollars spent weekly for fuel and pay. Businesses must have good cash flow to survive, which factoring provides. Receivable delays have a ripple effect contributing to financial impacts like late payment fees, loan defaults or credit line interest that could cost a transportation provider more than a factoring fee. Extended pay terms also stymie business growth in an industry currently short 50,000 drivers. Every business is different; therefore, factoring does not indicate poor cash management. Rather it shows companies working to thrive in this very capital-intensive industry.

Bad Rap #2: “I do all the work for you to get paid.”

The right factoring partner should decrease a client’s workload. Good factoring companies, like FreightRover’s partner Rover180, assume responsibilities for much of the back-office work around payments. First, factoring companies check shipper credit before a carrier picks up a load to ensure they are hauling for solvent businesses. Clients then submit invoice images by mobile phone or email. The factor issues payment to the client and collects on the invoice as it becomes due from the payor. The transportation provider can spend their time and resources moving more freight rather than calling multiple shippers collecting on invoices.

Bad Rap #3: “I’ve got bad credit. Factoring won’t help me.”

Factoring cares about the credit worthiness of the shipper/payor, not the payee. Many transportation providers that struggled with credit in the past prefer factoring. It often results in a lower rate than high interest short-term loans and provides quick payments to businesses unable to obtain credit otherwise.

Bad Rap #4: “You never know what you’ll actually be paid when you factor.”

Not all factoring companies are created equal. Understanding the factoring contract is key to managing receivables and knowing deposit amounts in advance. Some factoring companies offer a low invoice factoring rate, and then make additional money from monthly minimum requirements, invoice processing fees, and payment issuances. Other factoring companies might offer a slightly higher factoring rate and eliminate all other fees. Non-recourse agreements command higher rates than recourse. Factoring companies also consider how quickly they receive payment on invoices. Shippers with extended terms beyond 30 days could prompt higher factoring rates on invoices to account for the cash float. Businesses that know their contract and shippers, know their receivable amounts due.

Bad Rap #5: “Factoring costs too much.”

Companies have many financing options for their business, and factoring represents one of them. Transportation providers should compare factoring fees to other options like loans or credit to see what rate works best for their business. Factoring often proves to be the lowest fee option. Many suppliers that factor include the rate in their linehaul agreements with shippers to get paid quickly without compromising overall income. Businesses also benefit from other savings factoring companies may provide around equipment, fuel and insurance.

Factoring also creates some parity among shippers. Freight decisions transition from when a transportation provider will get paid to better metrics like lane quality, utilization and load rate to maximize profitability.

Bad Rap #6: “Factoring takes too long to get paid.”

Factoring issues quick payments by design. If a transportation provider does not receive payment within 24 hours, which is industry standard, a broken process with the factoring company likely exists and it is time to ask questions.

Bad Rap #7: “Once you start factoring, you can never stop.”

Factoring companies work hard to keep your business, but you can cancel based on contract terms. Contracts for reputable factors include defined durations and reasonable termination notice periods. To switch factoring partners, the process typically requires a written notice of termination and an authorization agreement to transfer receivables. The new factoring company will issue notice of assignments on the transportation provider’s behalf to each payor to update them on where to send funds. Switching factoring companies does require coordination between all parties, but the cost savings can be worth the work.

Businesses letting the myths outweigh the math might be missing out on money. To learn more about how the best factoring companies set themselves apart, watch our quick video on FreightRover Factoring, test our savings calculator, or request the right questions to ask factoring companies.

FreightRover Launches $500 Million Supply Chain Financing Facility

Crayhill Capital and other private investors add billions of dollars a year of funding capacity

(INDIANAPOLIS, IN, September 26, 2018) – FreightRover LLC (“FreightRover”), a provider of supply chain management and payment solution technology for the transportation industry, today announced it has closed on a new financing facility of up to $500 million with Crayhill Capital Management LP (“Crayhill”) and other investors. The new facility will support the supply chain and factoring operations conducted by FreightRover’s affiliate, Rover180 LLC (“Rover180”). Rover180 recently launched as a trade finance company focused on facilitating quick pay financing options for suppliers, with a special emphasis on transportation providers.

Rover180’s supply chain financing and factoring solutions allow buyers to benefit from extended pay terms while providing suppliers with accelerated receivables. “The capital resources provided by Crayhill and other investors, combined with our advanced technology platform, will enable FreightRover to fund the myriad of supply chain micro-payments across a highly fragmented supplier group,” said Eric Meek, CEO of FreightRover. “Traditional supply chain finance offers limited flexibility and often lacks automated efficiencies. Our capital and technology structure uniquely address both challenges for prospective clients.”

“Crayhill is excited to partner with FreightRover’s experienced management team to scale its innovative Rover180 platform for transportation supply chain finance,” said Josh Eaton, Managing Partner of Crayhill Capital. “We are impressed by FreightRover’s ability to offer value-added technological and management solutions in the transportation industry and are well-positioned to help Rover180 leverage this expertise to bring efficiencies and scale to the supply chain finance markets. Crayhill’s expertise in providing asset-based capital solutions to trade finance and specialty finance companies, combined with our collaborative approach to assisting our partners in optimizing and executing their business plans, is well suited to help Rover180 capture this attractive market opportunity.”

According to The Hackett Group, top buyer timetables in the US have extended to an average of nearly 57 days to pay suppliers. Managing delayed cash payments is increasingly difficult for small businesses, specifically in transportation where the average fleet size is less than 20 trucks. FreightRover’s leading software platform directly integrates with existing shipper systems to automate and streamline invoicing and straight-through payment processing.
Transportation One, an Inc. 5000 Chicago-based logistics firm, recently adopted FreightRover’s technology to bring efficiencies to the freight management process, including pay. “Leveraging the technology helps us compete with any logistics provider in the industry,” said Jamie Teets, CEO of Transportation One. “Now adding Rover180’s supply chain financing, we have a competitive edge with our carrier and customer partners.”

Customers such as Berry Global (NYSE: BERY) are working with Rover180 to provide vendors with immediate payment options, while maintaining historical financial funding practices.

About FreightRover
FreightRover offers a technology suite designed to streamline supply chain management. Launched in 2017 by transportation executives, FreightRover leverages system connections, cross-sector partnerships, and process automation in its platform design. The company specializes in fintech by
intersecting new financial strategies with technology development to push innovation. FreightRover is a Mira Best New Tech Startup winner and includes a growing list of industry-leading integrations within its robust platform. To learn more about FreightRover, visit www.freightrover.com.

About Rover180
Rover180 provides alternative supply chain finance and factoring programs that represent a “180 on traditional finance.” Headquartered in Indianapolis, Indiana, Rover180 leverages private capital and advanced technology to create flexible funding models that keep cash moving across today’s evolving supply chain. Learn more at www.rover180.com.

About Crayhill Capital Management
Crayhill Capital Management LP is a New York-based alternative asset management firm that specializes in asset-based private credit opportunities. The firm was launched in August 2015 and is registered with the U.S. SEC as an investment adviser. Crayhill strives to deliver capital solutions through tailored financing structures, focusing on developed markets. Its asset-based investment strategies draw on deep sector expertise and relationships throughout the structured finance and specialty finance markets. Crayhill’s investment process focuses on fundamental analysis of collateral combined with active structuring, with an emphasis on asset coverage and capital preservation. For more information please visit www.crayhill.com or email info@crayhill.com.