To end FreightRover’s week focusing on women in logistics, we talked with all-star Misty Darnell of Paschall Truck Lines about her thoughts on trucking and the unique female perspective.

Misty Darnell Image

How did you get into logistics?

I received an offer to work fulltime while I was getting my master’s degree in finance. I got my first taste of logistics and instantly loved it. I love that there’s a new challenge every day. Nothing’s ever perfect within logistics – there’s always something that can be better, that can be improved upon. I did that and then got offered a job to come back 5 years after I graduated and to work at Paschall Truck Lines. I knew I loved trucking and it was a good opportunity to get back into it and do something I knew I liked. From there I’ve progressed into the roll I’m in now, which is Vice President of Corporate Development.

What are the biggest problems in the industry?

I think for any carrier the driver market and driver turnover are big issues within our industry. We must make trucking more attractive to more people and get them involved because we have a driver shortage. I think our biggest challenge currently is deciding what we need to do as an industry to get more people involved and wanting to become truck drivers.

Do you think being a woman in the logistics industry gives you a different perspective? Do you think you’ve brought anything new to the table being a woman in a traditionally male-dominated field?

My mind races at 100 miles an hour and is constantly thinking about a bunch of things at once. When you think about logistics and trucking, that’s exactly how trucking is. There are so many things going on at once. It’s not just one process, you’re working through the whole system. You’ve got your trucks to worry about, you have your equipment, your customers, and your drivers.

I’m not sure why there hasn’t been as many women in trucking – I guess because from a driving perspective everyone just thought it was more of a male job. But from the carrier and driver side of things, it’s a huge opportunity for women to come into this industry to give a completely different perspective and thought patterns. Women tend to look at things very openly and question things at times. I know for myself, I always question why I’m doing something and what potential opportunities might be there. I think logistics for women can be a huge opportunity for them to be successful if they can come in and handle the driver aspect of it as well as the back office.

What can other women learn from your success?

Within my organization, I’m the only woman vice president and I’m also the youngest. I sit on two vendor customer advisory boards where I’m often the only woman in the room. It’s easy to worry about stereotypes like, “Oh you’re a woman. Do you know as much as everyone else?” However, when you’re able to open your mouth and speak very intelligently, you instantly gain respect. As a woman, you must prove yourself. Be confident in what you’re speaking about and be knowledgeable. That comes with any industry and any job, but especially here where there traditionally haven’t been very many women at higher levels.

How is technology helping to bring more people into the industry?

The technology advances help enables automation and back-end procedures, which free up time to work more hands-on with the drivers. Technology allows us to reallocate resources. There’s a driver shortage and there’s also a shortage on the experience side. We’re a training fleet, so we hire drivers from CDL school and put them through our training program. We’re able to expedite processes and reallocate those resources to training novice drivers to become better long-term drivers.

What is Paschall Truck Lines doing to get people into the transportation and logistics industries?

On the driver side of things, we have taken a hard focus at hiring additional women drivers. Our percentage right now is about 8% of our total driver pool. I know that doesn’t sound like a lot, but within the industry it’s actually really good. We see hiring more female drivers as a big opportunity and we are trying to increase that percentage monthly.